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Books to Feed the Hungry Reader at Your House

Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2010 in Good Reads

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As I sat in a chair(or rather scurried around the floor as Sparkles wove a maze between the chairs) and listened to the speaker, I patted myself on the back, “Great, she says I need to make great readers  and then my kids can learn anything they want to learn.  Two kids down, two to go.”  And then I listened some more and bought more books.  But in the afternoon someone asked the question that had also been forming in my mind.

“What if you’ve created a reader who carries a book from room to room each day, but you can’t keep up with them.  What I mean is, how can I find more books that are well-written but also still appropriate for him, how can I keep up with him?”

Exactly my problem with our 9 year old.

Lucky for me the speaker had an answer.  She recommended two books and said if we purchased the two books our readers would have hundreds and hundreds of books to choose from and we would approve of them all.

We just checked out one of the two recommended books from the library, perfect timing after a week of Mookie asking me as the hour of daily quiet time approached, “What do you think I should read mommy? And remember I like adventures.”

Books Children Love: A Guide to the Best Children’s Literature by Elizabeth Wilson

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After almost five years of homeschooling, something like pride has crept into my heart regarding my knowledge of great reads for families.  I keep the Sonlight lists handy(even though we don’t use the curriculum), take a peak at Ambleside, poke around on blogs,  and generally,  keep my eyes and ears open and for a few years begun to recognize an overlap amongst the recommended books.  I’ve become comfortable with their names, a running list from which our family can choose.  So I was both anxious to get this book and also worried that it would consist of already tapped book titles.

I was wrong.  How delighted I am to discover that there really are hundreds of books suggestions, three-quarters of them completely and wonderfully unknown to me!  The author has grouped the books under similiar subject/genre.  From Dance and Art, to several chapters on Literature, divided further into Fantasies, Realistic Stories-Historical, and Realistic-Modern to name a few.

When the speaker mentioned this book she said, “Give it to your child, let them mark all the books that interest them, putting their initial next to the ones that grab their attention.”  As soon as we get our own copy, we plan to do just that, but until then we requested 10 new-to-us books from the library today.

What are you feeding your hungry reader?

Bring on the comments

  1. Hmmm. We need this book. What reading level does it go up to? Do you think it has enough books that are hard enough for my eldest? I can’t request it from the library right now because my queue is full, along with my husband’s, which I use when mine is full. 20 books on hold is simply not enough!

  2. Aimee Guest says:

    The literature section has three levels with the third designated as 5th grade and up. I really don’t pay attention to reading levels though, we just look for good writing with good stories, which might be a picture book, a science book, or of course a great novel. You could also mix up her reading a bit and ask her to pick a book from the biography section that she’d like to learn more about.
    Yes, we dip into mookie’s card once in a while and so often have 30 holds going. Mr. Darcy loves(ahem, or not) finding out what titles are on hold for him.

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